• Lists,  Top Ten Tuesday,  Writing

    Top Ten Tuesday: The Cover Edition

    Welcome to Top Ten Tuesday! It’s the day where I write about ten book-ish things that make me happy.

    Today’s prompt from That Artsy Reader Girl is all about book covers, specifically redesigns. I’ll admit, I don’t follow that part of a book’s life so my spin on this is my top ten books that I have judged and bought based on their covers.

    Because really, we’re all guilty of that. Right??

    Here goes, in no particular order…

    1. Gingerbread by Helen Oyeyemi
    2. The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer
    3. Trust Exercise by Susan Choi
    4. Blindness by Jose Saramago
    5. The Nix by Nathan Hill
    6. Bitter Orange by Claire Fuller
    7. Lot by Bryan Washington
    8. All The Lives We Ever Lived by Katharine Smyth
    9. The Lager Queen of Minnesota by J. Ryan Stradal
    10. Recursion by Blake Crouch

    So while we are taught never to judge a book by its cover, I’m relatively successful doing so. Cover art is a huge part of the publishing process and for good reason.

    Because I can’t be the only creative-type falling in love with a book cover and then buying the book. 

    The funny thing – most of the time I really enjoy the book. And that makes me wonder about the science behind cover designs.

    What was the last book you judged and bought based on the cover? Did you enjoy the book?

    Happy Top Ten Tuesday!

     

     

  • ARC's,  Book Reviews

    Devotion: a book review

     ✂️✂️✂️✂️/5

    Devotion by Madeline Stevens

    Ella is young, broke, and trying to make it in New York City. Originally from a small town in Oregon, she finds herself out of her element when she is hired by a wealthy family as a nanny for their baby, William.

    Lonnie, William’s mother, is a writer and is 26 – the same age as Ella. James is her successful and handsome husband and on the surface they appear to have the perfect life.

    Lonnie crosses all the boundaries of the employer/employee relationship and the two become friends. Ella is captivated by Lonnie, her talent, old family wealth, and the social circles she moves in. What starts as a fascination, slowly moves into an obsession as Ella meticulously documents Lonnie’s possessions, writings, and relationships – ultimately becoming so enmeshed that it may be impossible to remove herself without serious consequences.

    I’ve seen this book billed as a thriller and for me, it was a slow burn. Told from the perspective of an unreliable narrator, I could not tell where the book was headed. I wasn’t trying to anticipate the twist in the traditional way that thrillers like to hook the reader.

    I wanted to know what happened next and that is what made this a page turner for me.

    An unreliable narrator written well is difficult to do and Madeline Stevens did this brilliantly. All the characters were well developed and while each had questionable motives, they were all likable at some point in the book. For me, that is usually the downfall of a book like this – I end up hating everyone and rooting for no one. But by the end of Devotion, I was still pulling for one character which is a sign of a good plot in my opinion.

    So while I wouldn’t call this a heart pounding summer thriller, it’s a smoldering story that will keep you guessing to the end. I read this debut novel in less than 24 hours and I am looking forward to the author’s next book!

    If you enjoy books like The Talented Mr. Ripley, A Ladder to The Sky, or The End of The Affair, you will enjoy Devotion. Look for it in your bookstore on August 13th.

     

  • Lists,  Recommendations,  Top Ten Tuesday,  Uncategorized,  Writing

    Top Ten Tuesday: Books About Writing

    Happy Tuesday! Today’s Top Ten Tuesday topic is a freebie so I’m going list my top ten books about writing, both fiction and nonfiction.

    In fictional books, I find that they make the plot and characters strong because the author is writing about a subject they know well. Many writers love to write about writing, and I enjoy those storylines.

    With nonfiction books, my favorites feel like I’m talking with a friend – or even better, being let in on someone’s best secrets.

    In no particular order here’s my top ten:

    1. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott – I have written here before about this book. Anne is a writer that reads like a friend – both in style and honesty about writing.
    2. A Ladder to The Sky by John Boyne – I finished reading this book earlier this month, and it quickly became one of my favorites of 2019. Thank goodness it’s fiction because it is a writer’s worse nightmare.
    3. The World According to Garp by John Irving – This novel is an old college favorite of mine that also happens to be one of the few books by John Irving that I liked – an unpopular opinion, probably so.
    4. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath – Yes, this book is depressing that was written by and tragic author in a semi-autobiographical manner. It’s also worth reading at least once; when you are not yourself depressed.
    5. Misery by Stephen King – The book was better than the movie. If you haven’t read this book or much by Stephen King, this is one I would put towards the top of the list of his books to read.
    6. Wired for Story by Lisa Cron – Based on brain science, this book brings out the science geek in me. It’s fascinating and worth a look if you want to approach your writing from a scientific point of view.
    7. Reading Like A Writer by Francine Prose – This is another book written by a phenomenal writer that reads like a conversation with a friend. I recently reread this book and will return to it over and over.
    8. Telling Stories: An Anthology for Writers by Joyce Carol Oates – This book is massive. It is a collection of short stories from a multitude of genres. It is well worth owning if short stories are your focus.
    9. The Writing Life by Annie Dillard – This book is newer to me and another one that is brutally honest about the craft of writing.
    10. To Show and To Tell by Phillip Lopate – Literary nonfiction was a tough genre for me to get a pulse on. I’m still not quite there, but this book was a fantastic starting point for me.

    Do you have any favorite books about writing? Thanks for stopping by!

  • Book Reviews

    The Gifted School: a book review

     

    The Gifted School by Bruce Holsinger

    ✂️✂️✂️✂️.5/5

    Set in a fictional, but an all too familiar affluent town of Crystal, Colorado, The Gifted School follows four families through the competitive admissions process for a new charter school for exceptionally gifted children.

    Rose, Samantha, Azra, and Lauren have been best friends since their kids were babies. Together they have supported each other through death, divorce, failures, and the challenges of raising children who may or may not be profoundly gifted. But when each family begins the arduous admissions process for this new school, their friendships will be put to the ultimate test.

    The dynamics of each family are slowly revealed, unraveled, and then put back together, skillfully told through multiple points of view.

    The Gifted School is packed with juicy drama, flawed characters, and precocious kids with obnoxious parents that were at times downright unlikeable. But as a parent myself, I found this book utterly believable as I have seen firsthand the lengths some parents will go to advance their child’s academic career, and the monsters created.

    The author did a fantastic job addressing issues of privilege, and while it was uncomfortable to read at times, he exposed the internal narrative prevalent in affluent communities. He also provided contrast with a fifth family – the housekeeper for two of the families – who also had a gifted son competing for a coveted spot in the new school.

    The inclusion of this storyline is what turned this from a juicy poolside book to an excellent book for me. I went into the book afraid that it would be yet another story of rich, badly behaving parents who never understood just how privileged they were. I appreciated that he tackled the issue instead of glossing over it for the sake of telling a story for the popular masses.

    The multiple points of view style worked well for this book and allowed for rich character development. But with that said, so much development revealed some terrible personality flaws. I didn’t mind that because again, I found it all sadly but completely believable given the recent college admissions scandal.

    My one small issue was that the unraveling of some characters was a bit drawn out and slowed the pace of the book a bit. It bogged me down a few times but only enough to cause me to skim some because…

    I get it – this guy is falling apart in every way possible.

    This book has something for everyone and if you are a parent of a school-aged kid, you will probably inhale this book as I did. If you enjoyed Big Little Lies, Miracle Creek, and multiple points of view plots, you should enjoy The Gifted School.

  • Lists,  Top Ten Tuesday,  Writing

    Top Ten Tuesday: Settings I Would Like to See

    Welcome to Top Ten Tuesday! Today I am listing the top ten settings I would like to see more of in books.

    1. The historic home of a significant past historical figure. Set in the modern-day.
    2. Thailand – I have read a few books set there and would love see more book settings that feature the culture, the beautiful surroundings, and the history.
    3. The theatre – whether it be a company, a physical location, or a particular show, I’m in. I’ve read two books recently that were set in theatres and loved both of them.
    4. A library – The Library Book was primarily set in the LA Central Library but was non-fiction. I would love to see a fictional book set in an existing public library.
    5. A current event – Think ripped from the headlines. The border crisis is the first to come to mind. While fictional, the awareness brought could be important if done well.
    6. A retirement village/assisted living – In my former life I worked primarily with retired folks. Oh, the stories they could tell me about their retirement homes.
    7. The airport – I could people-watch in an airport all day long. I may or may not make up stories about them too…
    8. A waiting room – This could be any kind of place people wait. This is another favorite place of mine to watch and make up stories about people.
    9. A teacher’s lounge – Think the secret lives of teachers.
    10. Time travel – I am a huge fan of time traveling fiction. I am always excited to see books set across an expanse of time navigated by a group of characters.

    Have you read any books set in these locations? I’d love to hear about them and add them to my To Be Read list!

    Thanks to That Artsy Reader Girl for hosting Top Ten Tuesday and thanks for stopping by.

%d bloggers like this: