• Book Reviews,  Writing

    Lake Season: a book review

    Lake essentials: Chacos sandals, a blanket, coffee & a good book

    ๐‘จ ๐’๐’๐’”๐’• ๐’๐’†๐’•๐’•๐’†๐’“, ๐’‚ ๐’๐’†๐’˜ ๐’๐’๐’—๐’†, ๐’‚๐’๐’… ๐’๐’๐’… ๐’”๐’†๐’„๐’“๐’†๐’•๐’” ๐’ƒ๐’†๐’„๐’Œ๐’๐’ ๐’•๐’‰๐’Š๐’” ๐’”๐’–๐’Ž๐’Ž๐’†๐’“ ๐’‚๐’• ๐’•๐’‰๐’† ๐‘ฉ๐’๐’–๐’†๐’ƒ๐’†๐’๐’ ๐‘ฐ๐’๐’.

    Synopsis:ย In a new series by Denise Hunter, when their parents die in a tragic accident, Molly Bennett and her siblings pull together to fulfill their parentsโ€™ dream: turning their historic Bluebell, North Carolina home back into an inn. The situation would just be temporaryโ€”three years at the mostโ€”then they would sell the inn and Molly could get back to chasing her own dreams.

    Adam Bradford (aka bestselling author Nathanial Grey) is a reclusive novelist with a bad case of writerโ€™s block. Desperate for inspiration as his deadline approaches, he travels to the setting of his next book, a North Carolina lake town. There he immediately meets his muse, a young innkeeper who fancies herself in love with his alter ego.

    Molly and Adam strike up an instant friendship. When Molly finds a long-lost letter in the walls of her inn she embarks on a mission with Adam to find the star-crossed lovers and bring them the closure they deserve. But Adam has secrets of his own.ย Past and present collide as truths are revealed, and Molly and Adam will have to decide if love is worth trusting.

    Review:ย I paused for a moment before accepting this review opportunity. I am typically not a big romance reader but there were enough other moving parts to intrigue me. By the second chapter, I was hooked because it’s not your typical romance.

    Complex grief – when there is more than one loss at the same time – is incredibly difficult in real life and the author was able to capture and write about it perfectly. I appreciated that the siblings were actuallyย siblings –ย they had issues, differences in grief, and different lives yet they still managed to work together in a realistic way.

    This is the second book this year that I have read where an old house a previous post office. I don’t know why but I love this premise. Maybe because mail is falling by the wayside in favor of emails or perhaps it’s because of the art of letter writing is becoming a thing of the past.

    Without giving any spoilers, I liked the relationship between Molly and Adam much better than I expected to. Add that to the fact that Adam is a writer and you had me hooked – I enjoy a good plot involving writers written by a writer.

    Last but not least, the characters were surprisingly well-developed for the first book in a series – another typical drawback for me with a series.

    This was a pleasant book to read on a rainy afternoon and I’m looking forward to loaning out this book while waiting for the second book. If you’ve read my reviews in the past, a big sticking point for me is who I can recommend a book to and for this book – the answer is anyone who enjoys romance with complex characters and multiple storylines that don’t always revolve around romance.

    Thanks to TLC Book Tours and TNZ Fiction for a free copy of this book in exchange for promotion and my honest review.

    Purchase Links

    Amazonย |ย Books-A-Millionย |ย Barnes & Noble

    Connect with Denise

    Websiteย |ย Facebookย |ย Twitterย |ย Instagram

  • Book Reviews

    Body Leaping Backward: Memoir of A Delinquent Girlhood

    โ€ข Hardcover: 240 pages
    โ€ข Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (July 16, 2019)

    The โ€œmesmerizing . . . daring and importantโ€* story of a risk-taking girlhood spent in a working-class prison town โ€”Andre Dubus III

    Synopsis: For Maureen Stantonโ€™s proper Catholic mother, the townโ€™s maximum security prison was a way to keep her seven children in line (โ€œIf you donโ€™t behave, Iโ€™ll put you in Walpole Prison!โ€).  But as the 1970s brought upheaval to America, and the lines between good and bad blurred, Stantonโ€™s once-solid family lost its way. A promising young girl with a smart mouth, Stanton turns watchful as her parents separate and her now-single mother descends into shoplifting, then grand larceny, anything to keep a toehold in the middle class for her children. No longer scared by threats of Walpole Prison, Stanton too slips into delinquencyโ€”vandalism, breaking and enteringโ€”all while nearly erasing herself through addiction to angel dust, a homemade form of PCP that swept through her hometown in the wake of Nixonโ€™s โ€œtotal warโ€ on drugs.

    Body Leaping Backward is the haunting and beautifully drawn story of a self-destructive girlhood, of a town and a nation overwhelmed in a time of change, and of how life-altering a glimpse of a world bigger than the one we come from can be.

    Review: For a child of the 80’s, married to a child of the late 60’s-70’s, this was a raw and emotional read. If you didn’t live through this time period, you tend to get a Forest Gump, hippie, free love idea of this time period when in reality teens growing up in the 1970’s faced tremendous amounts of upheaval, drugs, absentee parents due to their own drug and alcohol use and/or divorce and remarriage, etc.

    It’s quite honestly a miracle that a lot of them are here today and are functioning and successful members of society – like Maureen Stanton, the author of this book.

    Her writing style is unique and while her memories are interspersed throughout the book, I never got an angsty teen vibe. This book read as a mature reflection of her child and teen years and is not one I will soon forget.

    I also enjoyed the historical backdrop of Nixon’s presidency and war on drugs. I feel this is a time period many would like to forget and that I don’t read much about it in the books I read today.

    Body Leaping Backward was a quick read and memorable – especially for those of us who know and love people who grew up during this time. It would make a great gift for your adult child of the 70’s and one I would wholeheartedly recommend to anyone wanting to better understand this time period in our country’s history – I know it gave me a lot of insight into the world my husband grew in.

    Thanks to TLC Book Tours, the publisher, and the author for a copy of this book in exchange for my review and promotion. All thoughts are my own.

%d bloggers like this: